SKY 2013 Abstracts


Full Papers
Paper Nr: 2
Title:

Requirements Quality Knowledge Representation using Chunking Complexity Measurement: Prior to Formal Inspections

Authors:

David C. Rine and Anabel Fraga

Abstract: In order to obtain a most effective return on a software project investment, then at least one requirements inspection shall be completed. This means that a software project requirements inspection shall never be omitted. This is because the requirements, especially those written in natural language, is the most important form of software knowledge.A formal requirements inspection identifies low quality knowledge representation content in the requirements document. The knowledge quality of requirements statements of requirements documents is one of the most important assets a project must inspect. An application of the metrics to improve requirements understandability and readability during requirements inspections can be built upon the metrics shown.

Paper Nr: 3
Title:

Knowledge Re-use and Dissemination for Resource Elicitation in Software Engineering

Authors:

Max H. Garzon, Chris Simmons and Jason Knisley

Abstract: Software Engineering requires intense knowledge-driven practices and procedures that require team work in collaborative environments. Despite recent improvement in collaboration technology and the fact that over 80% of software project delays and overruns can be traced back to failures in proper requirement identification, requirement gathering remains an elusive art. This study reports on a survey of industry practices run to capture both experiential and procedural knowledge into an ontology that identifies and prioritizes it. The ontology is used as the foundation of a knowledge building tool, R.E.M., that can assist junior project managers (PMs) through the software process, including mitigating communication skills, negotiation skills, and time management facilities while eliciting requirements and managing small to medium software projects. Systematic use of R.E.M. will afford organizations with a principled and systematic repository of “institutional memories” of development experience, less dependent on personalities and more reflective of the culture of the organization.

Paper Nr: 7
Title:

KoDEgen: A Knowledge Driven Engineering Code Generating Tool

Authors:

Reuven Yagel, Anton Litovka and Iaakov Exman

Abstract: KDE – Knowledge Driven Engineering – is an extension of MDE to a higher level of abstraction, in which ontologies and their states replace the standard UML models. But in order to test in practice the KDE approach one needs to actually run the highly abstract ontologies and resulting models and code. This work describes the design and implementation of KoDEgen – a KDE tool for code generation – based on ontologies, ontology states and a scenario file. The implementation uses a modified Gherkin syntax. The tool is demonstrated in practice by generating the actual code for a few case-studies.

Paper Nr: 9
Title:

Automatic Generation of Semantic Patterns using Techniques of Natural Language Processing

Authors:

Pablo Suarez, Valentín Moreno, Anabel Fraga and Juan Llorens

Abstract: Within the discipline of natural language processing there are diffe-rent approaches to analyze large amounts of text corpus. The identification patterns with semantic elements in a text let us classify and examine the corpus to facilitate interpretation and management of information through computers. This paper proposes the development of a software tool that generates index patterns automatically using various algorithms for lexical, syntactic and semantic analysis of text and integrates the results into other projects in the area of research and other ontological formats. The algorithms in the system implemented various types of analysis in the context of natural language processing, so they can identify grammatical categories and semantic characteristics of words, making up index patterns. The results obtained correspond to a pattern list sorted by frequency of occurrence and take into account intermediate optional elements, which determine its relevance and usefulness to other projects. The developed system proposes a model of generation and storage of patterns, and a control interface that allows the specification of parameters and running reports.

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 5
Title:

Knowledge-driven Game Design by Non-programmers

Authors:

Iaakov Exman and Avinoam Alfia

Abstract: Game extension is an entertaining activity that offers an opportunity to test new design approaches by non-programmers. The real challenge is to enable this activity by means of a suitable infrastructure. We propose a knowledge-driven approach with natural game-player concepts. These concepts, found in game ontologies, include game abstractions and rules for game moves. The approach has been implemented and tested for board games. These include tic-tac-toe as a simplest example, enabling extensions of tic-tac-toe, say to a four-by-four board and Sudoku, a single player game of a very different nature.

Paper Nr: 10
Title:

An Anti-Turing Test: Social Network Friends’ Recommendations

Authors:

Iaakov Exman and Alex Krepch

Abstract: A routine activity of social networks’ servers is to recommend possible friends that one may know and stimulate addition of these people to one’s contacts. An intriguing issue is how these recommendation lists are composed. This work investigates the main factors involved in the recommendation activity, in order to reproduce these lists including its time dependent characteristics. After a preliminary analysis of actual data collected from social networks, we propose relevant algorithms. Besides conventional approaches, such as friend-of-a-friend, two techniques of importance have not been emphasized in previous works: randomization and direct use of interestingness criteria. An automatic software tool to implement these techniques is proposed. Its architecture and implementation is discussed.

Paper Nr: 11
Title:

Overcoming Software System Misuse by Domain Knowledge

Authors:

Reuven Gallant and Leah Goldin

Abstract: Often a perfectly functioning software system is misused causing undesirable and expensive consequences. The quest of this work is to prepare a priori the system for eventual extensions that – while not directly relevant to the system purpose – enable overcoming the consequences of its misuse. This is attained by means of domain knowledge to model the system misuse, beyond the original system model. In particular, if the behaviors of such a system have been modeled by statechart diagrams, these diagrams can be reengineered to suitably extend them, in order to correct the misbehavior consequences.